What You Need to Know About Sports and CBD, Part 2

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Written by | May 7th, 2020

This is the second part to What You Need to Know About Sports and CBD, Part 1.

When professional athletes speak publicly about their use of CBD, it generates curiosity and interest among their peers, their teammates, their fans, and other athletes. For those athletes who are new to CBD have questions about what it is, we have the answers for you.

Is CBD legal in every state? 

Purchasing CBD is federally legal as long as it doesn’t contain more than 0.3% THC, but some state laws have put restrictions on buyers. In Virginia, for example, people can only buy and possess CBD if they have a prescription.  

What’s the difference between hemp-derived CBD and marijuana-derived CBD? 

Hemp and marijuana come from the same family of plants, Cannabis Sativa L. Hemp-derived CBD and marijuana-derived CBD contain different levels of THC. Hemp plants contain less than 0.3% THC content, while marijuana plants contain higher levels of THC.  

Are all CBD products THC-free? 

No. Most CBD products are likely to have trace amounts of THC, particularly if the CBD was sourced from marijuana plants as opposed to hemp plants. Most CBD products contain non-detectable THC; products featuring CBD isolate have 0% THC in it. 

The industry and legal standard for THC concentration in CBD products derived from hemp is less than 0.3% THC by weight. This means that a CBD product may legally contain up to three parts of THC for every 1000 parts of oil by weight. 

In order to determine if a product is within this legal limit, reputable CBD manufacturers have their products tested by third-party labs to obtain a Certificate of Analysis (COA). The letters “ND” indicate this “non-detect” level of THC in a product. The THC amount in said product is too small to be detected by the instruments used in third-party testing. 

For more information, check out our blog: Hemp-Derived CBD Vs Cannabis-Derived CBD 

 Will CBD show up on a drug test? 

CBD shouldn’t show up on a drug test, but there have been cases of people using CBD products testing positive for THC. It depends on the quality and composition of the product the person is taking, as many CBD products contain trace amounts of THC. Hemp-derived CBD products are less likely to contain THC because they are legally required to have less than 0.3% THC content. Athletes who want to use CBD products but are afraid of failing a drug test should look for products featuring CBD isolate. 

What are the benefits of taking CBD? 

While much of the evidence of the benefits of CBD is anecdotal, studies have shown that CBD may help relieve pain, reduce inflammation, promote sleep, and reduce performance-related anxiety.  

Are there any side effects after ingesting CBD? 

Peter Grinspoon, a doctor at Harvard Medical School, states that side effects of CBD can include “nausea, fatigue and irritability.” CBD can also “increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does.” If you decide to try CBD and take other medications, consult with your doctor about possible interactions.  

How long does CBD stay in your system after ingestion?  

This depends on the way you ingest CBD. Also take into consideration that each person processes cannabinoids differently based on our unique body compositions.  

The different methods of ingestion are:   

Oral — swallowed — types of products include tinctures, oils, edibles, beverages, capsules. 

When CBD is swallowed, it moves through the digestive tract, where it is absorbed into the bloodstream. This method is the slowest route for CBD to move throughout the body, taking one to two hours, but also the longest amount of time that it is active. CBD may stay in your bloodstream one to six hours when ingested orally.   

Oral — sublingual (under the tongue) — types of products include oils and tinctures.  

The areas under your tongue, along your gums and in your cheeks are filled with capillaries that will absorb the CBD and deliver it directly to your bloodstream, thereby bypassing the digestive tract altogether. This method is faster than swallowing CBD, with the onset taking 15 minutes to an hour. When taken sublingually, CBD may stay in your bloodstream for six to eight hours.   

Inhalation — types of products include vape pens, dabs, high CBD cannabis. 

When CBD is inhaled, it moves to the lungs where it quickly passes into the bloodstream. This is the fastest way to get CBD into your system with an onset of seconds to minutes, but the CBD is only effective for a short amount of time. It may stay in your bloodstream for no more than two to three hours.  

Topical — applied to skin — types of products include creams and lotions.  

When you apply a CBD lotion or cream, the CBD is dispersed across the skin and absorbed into it, reaching muscles, cells, and nerves. Very little CBD will enter the bloodstream, if any.   

Transdermal — applied to skin — types of products include patches. 

Like topicals, transdermal are applied to the skin, but they do not behave the same way as a lotion or cream. A patch is placed in a venous area of the body, like the wrist, allowing the CBD to enter the bloodstream through the skin. They are designed to slowly release CBD through the skin at a constant rate. 

Resources 

https://www.wada-ama.org/en 

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cannabidiol-cbd-what-we-know-and-what-we-dont-2018082414476 

https://www.projectcbd.org/ 

https://www.uclahealth.org/cannabis/ 

 

 

 

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