January Recipe: Carrot-Ginger Soup

bowl of carrot ginger soup

If one of your New Year’s Resolutions was to eat more vegetables, this healthy and hearty soup recipe from Chef Stacy Primack will do the trick! Soup is one of the most satisfying winter foods, and this recipe will not disappoint with the sweetness of the carrots and squash mingling nicely with the crunch of the broccoli and bread.

YIELD: 4 servings

10mg CBD per serving


ingredients for soup recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 2 green onions (green part sliced at a bias), white part, chopped
  • 2 T. ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 1 (14oz.) can light coconut milk
  • 1 (15oz.) can cannellini beans
  • 3 cups water
  • 5 carrots, chopped rough
  • 1/2 acorn squash, seeded, chopped
  • 1.333 grams SōRSE liquid
  • 2 cups broccoli florets, chopped rough
  • 2 slices thick bread (like brioche), cut into cubes
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 425F.


2. Heat olive oil in Dutch oven pot. Bring to medium-high heat, add garlic, ginger, white part of scallions, and cook soft about 2 minutes. Add carrots, salt and pepper. Cook another couple of minutes.

3. In the meantime, on a cookie sheet or in a baking pan, toss squash pieces in olive oil and cook in over until roasted and soft, about 30 minutes. Remove from oven.

4. Add coconut milk, beans and liquid inside bean can, and water to Dutch oven on stove. Bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium and stir often; cook for another 20 minutes until carrots have softened. Add squash to this mix. Add SōRSE.

5. Toss broccoli and bread into bowl with more olive oil with salt and pepper, spread onto baking sheet lined with parchment paper or silicone baking mat. Roast and stir until broccoli is tender and browned and bread is toasted, about 15 min.

6. Puree soup in a blender in batches or with an immersion blender. Season with more salt and pepper. Divide soup among the bowls, drizzle with olive oil, and top with broccoli, croutons, and scallions (green biased-cut pieces).

What’s the Difference Between Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum, and Isolate?

cannabis plant and oil

Full spectrum, broad spectrum, and isolate refer to types of cannabis extracts, also called concentrates. The terms are intended to indicate the amount of plant-produced therapeutic chemicals present in addition to the primary cannabinoids (THC and/or CBD); they are a shorthand way of conveying the diversity of bioactives in a given extract. However, there is not consensus on, let alone regulatory enforcement of, definitions for these terms. In an industry with so much energy and so little alignment, it’s not surprising that there are widely differing interpretations flying around, yet the choice of extract is a foundational decision for producers.

To understand the relevance of phytochemical diversity to product development, why these terms were coined, and how they may be interpreted today, we must first discuss the Entourage Effect – and to discuss that, we must first explain the Endocannabinoid System (ECS).

The Endocannabinoid System

The ECS is an ancient network of neurotransmitters, their receptors and enzymes. It is present in all extant vertebrate species and some insects. It evolved a whopping 543 million years ago, right before the Permian Extinction, the event that nearly ended life on Earth. (Interestingly, the cannabis plant didn’t show up until 63 million years ago, in the late Cretaceous.) Humankind’s discovery of the ECS has happened gradually over the latter part of the last century, beginning in 1964 with the identification and synthesis of THC by Mechoulam and Gaoni, pioneering Israeli scientists. It was named by Italian biochemist Vincenzo Di Marzo (much of the most compelling and interesting research about cannabis comes from overseas, where research isn’t hobbled by federal scheduling), who initially outlined its influence in “eating, sleeping, relaxing, forgetting and protecting” in the early 90s. This system plays a critical role in almost every regulatory function of our bodies, that has been with us since before there were mammals, that survived a die-off of 90 percent of the planet’s species – and yet, due to persistent stigma around cannabis, we know relatively little about it.

Now that the curtain around cannabis is starting to lift, consumers are becoming more curious about which cannabis options work best for them and why. There is a lot of information out there, easily accessible through a Google search, but it is conflicting and muddled with anecdata. Most consumers do not have the time or inclination to deep-dive into cannabis science; they just want to know what they can expect. The problem is, the ECS is as unique as a fingerprint; everyone is different, and trial and error is inherent in the journey toward optimization. However, the chemicals produced in the plant alongside cannabinoids have more predictable and well-studied effects than the cannabinoids themselves. Knowing the phytochemical profile of a cannabis extract can help developers define and standardize their products at scale.

The Entourage Effect

The definition of the Entourage Effect is relatively simple: it is the theory that cannabinoids have more favorable action when delivered with a higher proportion of native phytochemicals such as terpenes, flavonoids, and other cannabinoids. This manifests as both amplification of positive effects (efficacy) and modulation of undesirable ones (tolerability). The term was coined in 1988 by Raphael Mechoulam (the same Israeli scientist who discovered THC) and its potential mechanisms were first illuminated by Dr. Ethan Russo in his landmark 2011 paper, “Taming THC.” Put even more simply, the Entourage Effect is a way of saying that, when it comes to cannabis, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

The interactions between various cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids are staggeringly complex; it will take decades of research to parse them. Fortunately, terpenes and flavonoids have at least as much scientific research behind them as ahead of them. They are already common additives in many commercial processed goods, especially cosmetics, and of course, food – plants make tens of thousands of different terpenes alone. They can also be synthesized.

The Entourage Effect is the reasoning behind extractions that seek to retain as much of the native phytochemical context as possible. However, this comes at the expense of standardization and palatability, so each use case will necessitate its own balance of values.

Creating Cannabis Extracts

Cannabinoids are produced most abundantly in the resin glands of the cannabis plant, called trichomes. To be used in processed beverages or topicals, these glands must first be concentrated, then their oils separated from plant waxes and other non-useful vegetative matter. There are two main categories of processes to do this: solvent and non-solvent. Various levels of technological sophistication exist within each category, and most finished extracts employ elements of both.

Solvent: In this method, a solvent is added to dissolve the cannabinoids, then evaporated, leaving a concentrated oil. Solvents can be further divided by polarity. Non-polar solvents, such as butane, dissolve only non-polar compounds from the plant, in this case the oils and other lipids making up the trichome heads. Polar solvents, such as ethanol, will extract both non-polar and polar compounds, including water-soluble compounds such as chlorophyll. These bring with them with strong herbaceous flavors, however many polar compounds are desirable from a therapeutic standpoint.

Non-solvent (Mechanical): Mechanical extraction processes vary from ancient hand-pressed hash to modern distillates. Using temperature or pressure changes, cannabinoid oils can be separated without the use of a solvent. Distillation uses the variability in boiling points of a plant’s constituent chemicals to yield very pure extracts. Solvent-extracted concentrates are evaporated and then condensed at precise temperatures. The resulting product typically tests at 85-97% purity.

Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum, and Isolate

Now that we have covered the reasoning and methods for creating cannabis extracts, here are the terms used to categorize them.

Full Spectrum means the maximum amount of helpful native phytochemicals are retained during extraction, including THC. There are no precise regulatory definitions, but the goal is to remove extraneous lipids while retaining an identical ratio of cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids from the original plant source material. (This can only be verified by testing the material before and after the extraction.) True full spectrum extracts are more rare than one might expect; most extractions lose significant terpenes and flavonoids during processing because they are much more volatile than cannabinoids. Ethanol and very low heat (the RSO method or whole plant oil), or an extremely long vacuum extraction process can yield full spectrum extracts.

Broad Spectrum applies to extractions which aim to retain a large complement of phytochemicals, but without the THC. This allows for some Entourage Effect action without the stigma and intoxication that accompanies cannabis’ most notorious component. Hemp, defined as cannabis plants containing <.3% THC, forms the basis for most broad spec extracts. Broad spectrum can also be created by either adding terpenes, flavonoids, and minor cannabinoids to CBD isolate or by removing THC from full spectrum extract via distillation.

Distillate takes quite the opposite approach of full spectrum, seeking to remove everything but the cannabinoid(s) of interest. After undergoing solvent extraction, the concentrated oil is run through the short-path distillation process described above, often multiple times, to purify it. Some suppliers will advertise “full-spectrum distillate” but this is contradictory. If terpenes or other bioactives are reintroduced after distillation, the product is sometimes also called broad spectrum.

Isolate is the purest form of extracted cannabinoids, a crystalline powder with a purity of 99.9%. It is created through additional solvent processes after distillation. The additional processing steps are expensive, but due to the extreme purity of the final product, cheaper crude extracts can be used as starting material without concern for residues.

Choosing the Right Spectrum

Both full and broad spectrum concentrates offer the benefits of the Entourage Effect. At first glance, it may seem that using the most phytochemically diverse extract is a no-brainer: CBD is a weak actor on its own, but its action can be amplified with other cannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids and sterols. If your CBD product is relatively low-dose, having a diversity of phytochemicals is even more important. Beyond their potential therapeutic effects, all these minor players also give cannabis its depth, creating a symphony of flavor and smell, and ultimately making the bitterness of cannabinoid extracts more palatable.

However, even a pleasant symphony of flavors can have a strong personality; it will never be a neutral canvas onto which flavor scientists can project their artistry. Rather, it is a dominating flavor of its own – and one that changes with every batch of extract. In emulsions, the diversity of chemicals, each with slightly different weights, is also a challenge. Full and broad spectrum extracts are wild cards, and in large-scale commercial applications, the variability that makes them beautiful also make them unpredictable in terms of flavor.

By contrast, distillates and isolates offer consistency and standardization; they are a known quantity. Without much personality of their own, one can use a wider variety of flavorings to make the formulation really shine, and they are far more consistent in emulsions (as long as the supplier is reliable). The consumer can also expect the same effects and sensory experience every time.

Choosing the correct starting material for product development is a careful balance of values. For most commercial purposes, purer extracts are desirable because they allow producers to standardize and iterate based on known, reliable effects. However, for the more wellness-focused, the benefits of a fuller complement of phytochemicals are worth the variability.

At SōRSE, we have often sought to strike a balance between standardization and efficacy. Many of our products are what I like to call “Designer Spectrum” – they reconstruct the phytochemical profile block by block to yield a consistent but fully articulated product – similar to molecular gastronomy, but for cannabis.

SōRSE Employee Spotlight: Zahra Marin

headshot of Zahra

Meet our Manager of Quality Assurance and the Analytics Lab, Zahra Marin, who brings over five years of experience in quality management in FDA-regulated industries. Zahra’s background in Chemistry and Business Administration allows her to bridge different industry experiences with the goal of implementing thorough quality programs. After years of living in frigid North Dakota and the Midwest, she is happy to have settled on the West Coast and is now adjusting to life as a mother, having given birth to her first child at the end of December. She and her husband also love to travel – and their goal is to visit every state!

How did you end up working at SōRSE?

Coming from the ChicagoLand area and passing by Kansas, my husband and I have always wanted to live on the West Coast (the Best Coast). When he had a job opportunity in Tacoma, I followed and started working for Amazon. I thought working for a big corporation in a liberal state would be a dream.

After just a few weeks, I realized that working for such a big company wasn’t for me. It felt way too impersonal, and there was too much structure. Everything is tracked in multiple programs, no one knows anyone, and people just walk by without saying “Hello.” There are cameras everywhere, a lot of security, facial recognition devices, controlled access everywhere, you name it.

After deciding to remove myself from that environment, I found out about SōRSE and thought how cool it would be to work in this industry in the state of Washington. I liked that it was a startup; it seemed like a place where I could make a difference. There weren’t a lot of people here at first, but you could really see how everyone came together. I thought the building itself was pretty quirky and in an odd neighborhood, but I liked that it had personality.

Cannabis was not legal in states I lived in before, so I didn’t know much about it. CBD definitely interested me, and I wanted to learn about the fast-growing industry and see SōRSE grow with it. Working Quality in a company that uses CBD means that you get to do a lot of detective work and figure things out on your own, which is very satisfying.

There aren’t a lot of places where you are on the cusp of discovery, and here at SōRSE It feels like we are modern day cowboys during the Green Rush.

What have been some of the significant moments in your time here? What are you proud of?

The renovation of the lab has been an important project in the last few months, and it is coming along nicely. A huge project we have been working on is restructuring and revising our safety plan and making sure it is aligned with the company’s goals. When we have had quality issues, we have worked well as a team to find out the problem, gathered documentation, and investigated, and then were able to make decisions on how to proceed.

I find a lot of satisfaction putting systems in place – it’s important to get information out of people’s heads and into a place where others can access it. I am also very happy about working with other departments to organize information flow, how the team tackles major challenges and is committed to finding reliable information when they have to solve a problem.

What do you love most about what you do?

What I really love most is that I get to use so much of what I have learned in my educational and work background in QA/QC—Business, Microbiology, and Analytical Chemistry. I feel like everything I have done in the past has prepared me for this role. And I love that I have great people to turn to who are so committed to the success of SōRSE and are not hesitant to offer their expertise.

What can be challenging about your work?

With this industry being so new, sometimes there just isn’t any information out there that you can go by. This is especially difficult when working in QA/QC where the goal is standardization. This means that we need to put our detective hats on to find resources, solutions and answers to our questions; this kind of work is challenging but intellectually stimulating. Sometimes we have to create the answers we need and show the work behind why we think it is a valid answer.

Where do you see yourself in this role moving forward?

I foresee making our food safety program even more robust. This means fine-tuning the foundation work we are doing right now. For me personally, I want to continue to grow the quality side and take on aspects of the regulatory systems, to keep the customers safe and the quality of our products high.

Can you share a fun fact that not a lot of people know about you?

I am originally from Morocco – I lived there until I finished high school. Then I went to Fargo, North Dakota for my undergrad studies. NDSU had a low cost of living (I wonder why?) and good quality programs. The transition to Fargo was difficult; between the harsh weather, strong accents and me looking so different from everyone else, I felt like I was living on Mars…except Mars was warmer on some days. Living there makes me appreciate the beauty of Seattle, the people, and the mild climate.

SōRSE Technology Announces Two New Members to Board of Directors

sorse drop

SōRSE Technology, the leading water-soluble CBD, hemp and terpene emulsion provider for infused CPG brands, announced today the appointment of two new members to its Board of Directors. Mary Wagner and Allen Hsieh’s tenures on SōRSE’s selective board will begin effective immediately.

Mary Wagner is a recognized executive leader and board director who has established a reputable career in the food industry for creating innovative products, managing risks and developing measures to ensure food quality and safety. Wagner is an industry veteran that has held key positions including Senior Vice President of Global Product Innovation, Food Safety, and Quality for Starbucks Coffee Company, General Manager of Mars Botanical, a division of Mars Candy, and Chief Technology and Quality Officer at E. and J. Gallo. She currently leads MK Wagner and Associates Inc., a solutions provider in innovation and food safety. In addition to serving on SōRSE Technology’s Board, Ms. Wagner also serves on the Board of Directors at Griffith Foods International, Jones Dairy, and Skagit Valley Malting. She also chairs the Food Safety Advisory Board for Ecolab. “I hope to contribute my knowledge in food and beverage, as well as my years of experience and connections with industry, government and academics to help make cannabinoids mainstream sooner rather than later,” said Wagner.

Allen Hsieh brings over 25 years of experience in business and finance to SōRSE’s board and has managed companies that generated $100 to $500 million in revenue annually. Mr. Hsieh’s broad financial background has spanned various industries, including all aspects of financial operations, reporting and internal controls, sale or divestitures of businesses and raising capital. Most recently, Mr. Hsieh served as the Chief Financial Officer for A Place for Mom, North America’s largest senior living and care referral service, where he successfully led the sale of the company from Warburg Pincus to Silver Lake Partners and General Atlantic. Mr. Hsieh has also served as the Chief Financial Officer for two publicly traded companies, Flow International and InfoSpace, Inc. He has successfully managed relationships between company boards and private equity groups with their respective stakeholders and currently serves as a Board Advisor to Ultrata based in Seattle. “Given how much progress has been made in the cannabis industry, this is an exciting space to work in, and I look forward to strategically positioning the company and its technology in the marketplace.”

“We are excited and honored to have attracted such a high caliber of talent to SōRSE Technology’s Board since both Mary and Allen have been associated with the best technology, food, and beverage brands in the world,” said SōRSE Technology CEO Howard Lee. “Our company has had a longstanding mission to make cannabinoid consumption as safe, accessible and enjoyable as possible and we look forward to tapping into Mary and Allen’s invaluable industry and business expertise to reach wider audiences.”

SōRSE 2019 Recap

SoRSE team photo

For a company that started 2019 with 15 employees and is finishing with over 40, it has been an exciting year for SōRSE Technology, one filled with change, growth, challenge, and promise.  The articles listed below document some of the many highlights for SōRSE from the year — from Geekwire’s peek into the goings-on in our Seattle offices and labs, to a press announcement about our expanded partnership agreement with Valens. The articles highlighted throughout the year are on some of the people who power SōRSE and the events where we have showcased our products and our knowledge about the marketplace. SōRSE is definitely ending the year on a high note, having emerged as an innovative leader in the industry.

SōRSE Featured in Geekwire

In May, a team from Geekwire paid a visit to SōRSE headquarters and wrote this piece about the company’s beginnings, the products #powered by SōRSE, and on the magic happening in the labs. Writer Kurt Schlosser commented, “Lee considers what his scientists are working on to be more of a platform — like Gortex — and he said the breakthrough for the company has been in understanding food technology, speed to market, and getting the right people to actually help drive the product.”

Forbes: Five Questions with Scott Riefler 

In July, Chief Science Officer, Scott Riefler, was interviewed by columnist Warren Bobrow on his background in aerospace and food science, as well as the work he is doing at SōRSE. When asked about short and long-term goals, Scott commented: “Regardless of the timeframe, our team is always focused on improving and evolving our technology.”  

Emily Skrobecki Recognized as Fifteen Power and Innovation Women in Cannabis 

In August, Manager of Process Engineering, Emily Skrobecki, was named one of the Cannabis industry’s most powerful and innovative women by Forbes. When describing Emily, writer Warren Bobrow commented, “The challenge of the unknown is what drives Skrobecki to search for knowledge and dive deep into this type of science.”

Mad Tasty Featured on the Today Show

In September, Ryan Tedder, frontman of the band, OneRepublic, appeared on the Today Show to talk about his successes, his failures, his creative process. Toward the end of the interview, after being handed a can of Mad Tasty (powered by SōRSE)  and asked what it was, he commented, “In all my downtime, I started a beverage company about a year ago with Interscope Records, my label, and some friends…It’s got 20 mg of CBD in each can…zero sugar, all natural. I drink about five a day.”

SōRSE Debuts Agglomerated Powder at SupplySide West 

In October, at SupplySideWest in Las Vegas, the SōRSE team unveiled its agglomerated CBD powder, which allows for rapid hydration for instant beverages. When describing the power of the powder, VP of Science, Michael Flemmens commented, “This is a game-changer and silver bullet for the cannabis functional ingredient space and infused products.” 

Diana Eberlein Gives Her Insight on the Celebrity and Cannabis Wave Featured on CNN 

In November, CNN ran an article on Drake entering the cannabis space through a partnership with Canopy Growth. VP of Marketing, Diana Eberlein, shared her thoughts on which types of celebrity brands resonate with customers, and which don’t. “People are attracted to brands that are real and authentic…If it feels inauthentic, they will lose that audience very quickly.”

Emily Skrobecki Named in High Times Female 50

Also in November, Manager of Process Engineering, Emily Skrobecki, was honored for her work in the cannabis industry in the inaugural honoree class of the High Times’ Female 50. Each woman featured on the list was nominated and voted on by the public. High Times staffers wrote, “This collection represents fifty women in all areas of the cannabis space, from research to business and from politics to activism, who have made their mark in a truly significant and impactful way.” 

SōRSE Wraps up the Year with a Successful BevNET Live Debut 

In December, the SōRSE team traveled to Santa Monica for the company’s debut as an exhibitor at BevNET Cannabis Forum and as a Gold Sponsor of BevNET Live Winter 2019. A highlight of the conference was SōRSE partnering with Drop Water and hosting a “Build Your Own CBD Beverage” station where guests could create their own CBD beverage. CEO Howard Lee shared, “Our team showed the breadth and array of flavor and dosage possibilities to attendees and generated positive buzz around our technology and this emerging category.”

SōRSE Expanded Partnership Agreement with Valens 

In December, SōRSE and Valens announced their expanded partnership agreement, which grants Valens an exclusive license for Canada, Europe, Australia and Mexico to use the proprietary SōRSE emulsion technology to produce, market, package, sell and distribute cannabis-infused products. Tyler Robson, CEO of Valens, commented, “We expect the expanded exclusive territory will provide our clients with improved visibility and greater opportunity as they look to build global businesses around cannabis-infused products over the long term.”

2019 has proven that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts at SōRSE. Yes, we have increased our staff three-fold in twelve months, but what is most important about this growth is the intelligence, innovation, and the range of professional experience that each member of the team brings to the table. SōRSE is powered by creative, analytic, fun-loving people who are passionate about what they do, who believe in the products they are producing, and who appreciate the strengths and talents of their co-workers. When we look back at what the company has accomplished in 2019, we can only be excited for what is ahead of us in 2020 and beyond. 

Holiday Recipe: Celebratory Cran-Apple Sauce

sorse bottle and finished cranberry sauce

There’s much to celebrate at this time of year — Winter Solstice, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and New Year’s to name a few. With these holidays come celebrations with friends and family, sharing food, clinking glasses, and enjoying the moment together. Need a dish to bring to a gathering?  Try Chef Stacy’s Celebratory Cran-Apple Sauce recipe to complement the turkey, ham, or stuffing on the table.

chef stacy holding sorse and cranberry sauce

YIELD: 2.5 quarts

About ½ cup per serving

10mg CBD per serving


ingredients for cranberry sauce recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 bags frozen cranberries
  • 4 cups water
  • 8 Macintosh apples, cored (leave skins on if a thicker sauce is preferred), cut into chunks
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 16.667 grams SōRSE broad spectrum CBD

DIRECTIONS

cranberry sauce ingredients in pot

1. Place cranberries, water, and apples into a large pot. Bring to a gentle boil, then turn to medium low heat.


cranberry mixture in food mill

2. Cook for approx. 45 minutes until apples are soft to the touch. While hot, transfer portions of cranberry-apple mixture.

cranberry mixture in food mill

3. Put into a food mill with the smallest hole setting. Hand crank until all is pressed through. Stir sugar in, then add CBD until evenly incorporated for even dispersion. Refrigerate overnight.

sorse bottle and finished cranberry sauce

SōRSE TECHNOLOGY EXPANDS AGREEMENT WITH VALENS

Valens logo

SōRSE Technology, the leading water-soluble CBD, hemp and terpene emulsion provider for infused CPG brands, announced an amended manufacturing and sales license agreement with Canadian cannabinoid-based product company The Valens Company. The agreement grants Valens a license to produce, market, package, sell and distribute products made with SōRSE’s proprietary emulsion technology to international markets in EuropeAustralia and Mexico, in addition to Canada.

The agreement also allows for Valens to produce and sell SōRSE’s portfolio of branded products in the agreed upon territories. This includes the top 2 infused beverages in Washington State — Happy Apple, a cannabis-infused apple cider, and Major, a cannabis-infused fruit drink.



The initial five-year agreement will increase the addressable market by almost 20 times, from 37 million people in the current Canadian agreement to 700 million people in the new international agreement. SōRSE Technology currently works with over 30 brand clients in the United States, including leading CBD beverage makers Mad Tasty and Vybes. SōRSE Technology provides product developers with a CBD solution that is shelf stable, homogeneous, and better tasting with the highest safety and quality standards.

“We are proud to expand our partnership with Valens and leverage their near-term access to various global markets,” said Howard Lee, CEO of SōRSE. “Over the last year, our team of more than 40 plus professionals has continued to actively focus on creating and developing innovative, desirable products and formats of consumption for cannabis consumers. As emulsion technology becomes more popular through new delivery methods such as ingestion, transdermal, topical and more, it is imperative that quality and safety in consumption leads all innovation in this sector. This is a shared value and mandate that our teams at SōRSE and Valens both prioritize. We look forward to continuing this working relationship with Valens and introducing our award-winning emulsion technology to global markets.”

“We have seen incredible interest from our current and potential clients regarding the SōRSE emulsion technology and we are thrilled to finalize the expanded license agreement with SōRSE,” said Tyler Robson, CEO of Valens. “We expect the expanded exclusive territory will provide our clients with improved visibility and greater opportunity as they look to build global businesses around cannabis-infused products over the long term.”

The SōRSE emulsion technology, which offers an improved flavor profile, consistent dosing and experience, and safe ingredients, changes the landscape for future cannabis infused beverages, food items, and topicals. In the past, ingestibles have been plagued by the stigmas associated with edibles – namely inconsistent dosing and experience, and bad taste.  With the expanded agreement, SōRSE can eliminate the typical concerns around ingestibles around the world, making edibles and topicals a preferred method of consumption for consumers.

The manufacturing and distribution agreement between SōRSE Technology and The Valens Company was closed at $10 million USD, comprised of $6 million USD in cash and $4 million USD to be issued in Valens common shares. The agreement carries an initial 5-year exclusive term with a 2-year renewal of the exclusivity, subject to operational and financial performance. Valens will also transfer royalty payments to SōRSE calculated as a percentage of sales and will be subject to an annual minimum of $2 million over the 5-year term.

About SōRSE Technology
SōRSE Technology is a water-soluble CBD, hemp extract and terpene emulsion technology designed for producers to provide consumers with a better cannabis experience with near-perfect dosing, stability, and safe ingredients. Our patented technology converts oil into SōRSE, our water-soluble emulsion, for seamless integration as an ingredient in a beverage, food item or topical. For more information, visit www.sorsetech.com

About The Valens Company
The Valens Company is a global leader in the end-to-end development and manufacturing of innovative, cannabinoid-based products. The Company is focused on being the partner of choice for leading Canadian and international cannabis brands by providing best-in-class, proprietary services including CO2, ethanol, hydrocarbon, solvent-less and terpene extraction, analytical testing, formulation and white label product development and manufacturing.  Valens is the largest third-party extraction Company in Canada with an annual capacity of 425,000 kg of dried cannabis and hemp biomass at our purpose-built facility in Kelowna, British Columbia which is in the process of becoming European Union (EU) Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) compliant.  The Valens Company currently offers a wide range of product formats, including tinctures, two-piece caps, soft gels, oral sprays and vape pens as well as beverages, concentrates, topicals, edibles, injectables, natural health products and has a strong pipeline of next generation products in development for future release.  Finally, the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary Valens Labs is a Health Canada licensed ISO 17025 accredited cannabis testing lab providing sector-leading analytical services and has partnered with Thermo Fisher Scientific to develop a Centre of Excellence in Plant-Based Science.  For more information, please visit http://thevalenscompany.com.  The Company’s investor deck can be found specifically at http://thevalenscompany.com/investors/

SōRSE TECHNOLOGY WRAPS UP SUCCESSFUL BEVNET DEBUT

Person holding a drink bottle in front of DropWater kiosk

SōRSE Technology made their BevNET debut as an exhibitor at the BevNET Cannabis Forum and Gold Sponsor of BevNET Live Winter 2019 that took place December 8-10 at the Loews Hotel in Santa Monica, Calif. Through several attendee activations, events and seminars, SōRSE showcased their water-soluble cannabinoid technology in liquid and agglomerated powder forms for infusing CBD, hemp and terpenes in beverages.

SōRSE Technology provides producers with a stable and scalable solution for incorporating CBD in their product suite(s). Howard Lee, SōRSE Technology CEO, commented that “BevNET Live was the perfect opportunity for us to demonstrate our technology, and showcase how easy it is to add CBD to a beverage and make it taste great without added sugar!”

In partnership with Drop Water, SōRSE hosted a “Build Your Own CBD Beverage” station at Beach Bar at the Loews Hotel in Santa Monica for guests to build their own broad spectrum CBD water using a Drop Station that uses 100% compostable materials for their 14 oz beverage. Attendees were able to choose from three flavors – cucumber, lemon black tea, and lemonade, and add their preferred dosage of SōRSE Broad Spectrum CBD – 15mg, 20mg, or 25mg.

Conference attendees were also treated to 20mg vials of CBD liquid isolate that SōRSE employees handed out for guests to add to in their beverages throughout the show, including their coffee, tea, water or beer.

During the show, SōRSE Technology’s technical project manager, Mike Schmitt, presented key steps on how to identify and select a CBD supplier to over 50 BevNET attendees at a workshop titled “How to Select a CBD Supplier.”

To celebrate their debut, SōRSE hosted an after party at Cassia in Santa Monica for about 80 guests. During the networking social, guests sipped on some products by SōRSE Technology’s clients, such as Mad Tasty, a CBD sparkling water by Ryan Tedder of OneRepublic.

“We’re excited to have reached and educated so many industry folks at BevNET about the massive potential of CBD beverages,” said Lee. “Our team showed the breadth and array of flavor and dosage possibilities to attendees and generated positive buzz around our technology and this emerging category.”

Find out how SōRSE can be the right solution for your product development needs here.

The Science Behind a CBD Product

Zach in the SoRSE lab

While the cannabis industry is unique in many ways, product producers still need to commit to rigorous scientific practices to create and maintain a quality product. In the rush to catch the CBD wave, it can be tempting to cut corners on research, expertise, and, most of all, the testing necessary to deliver a quality product. That said, we do so at not just our own peril but that of the burgeoning industry. Here is an overview of the scientific processes advised for CBD product developers.

DO YOUR HOMEWORK

Well-designed, peer-reviewed research supporting structure-function claims for CBD is still relatively sparse, but it is expanding rapidly. Begin there — confirm that your idea has some basis in science. Then, refine your ideation with market projections and experienced consultancy. Research, or have your consultant advise on, the ideal potency for your form factor. It will be different for inhalants, edibles, beverages, and topicals; reliable work has been done in each product category. Then consider what supporting ingredients should be included to optimize bioavailability and the Entourage Effect. You can also look to related industries for scientific support; what can we infer from studies done on cosmetics, aromatherapy, asthma, sports medicine? This requires a lot of reading, but most scientific papers aren’t as dense as they appear at the outset. If they are too technical, you can always have a consultant parse them.

Expect to iterate according to the rapidly developing state of the art. As our scientific understanding expands, we are not just likely but guaranteed to have our current assumptions upended. In the cannabis industry, frequent reformulation and rebranding are the norm, not the exception.

PLAN FOR YOUR TESTING OUTLAY

After the product roadmap is outlined, everything boils down to testing. Test at every stage of processing (or ensure that your partners do): Farm, plants, extraction facility, extract, ingredients, lab, packaging, and finished product. Due to the importance of testing, some purchasing decisions must be made at the outset. Are you going to buy some of your own testing equipment or use a lab for everything? There are benefits and drawbacks to both, and the balance depends on your unique product and strategy.

BE THOUGHTFUL ABOUT PACKAGING
Package design is not just branding; the type of packaging used can have a real effect on shelf life. Exposure to light, heat, and air degrades cannabinoids (and other ingredients as well). Choose opaque packaging whenever possible, and try to minimize the amount of air the product will come into contact with (that’s why Velvet Swing uses an airless pump bottle, for example). The expansion of regulations will trickle down to packaging requirements. Think ahead about labeling and child-proofing.

PRIORITIZE INGREDIENT PARTNERS

It’s as true in the cannabis industry as it is everywhere else — high-quality products start with high-quality ingredients. For the extract itself, first decide on the degree of processing you will pay for. Will you do your own extraction, purchase hemp-extracted CBD oil, or purchase an even more refined product such as SōRSE? The more pure the extract, the more expensive it is likely to be, but it can absolutely be worth it due to the savings in equipment and testing costs.

Once you have your suppliers narrowed down and have received your first samples, they must be tested for potency and contaminants: pesticides, heavy metals, solvent residues, bacteria and fungi are standard. CBD companies should provide COAs, but at the beginning it’s best to verify via independent labs. However, while I recommend it initially, this testing is expensive, and you’ll quickly want to identify trusted, vertically-integrated suppliers whose plant-to-sale testing data you can access remotely. Supplier validation is crucial due to the complexity of the regulatory landscape. At SōRSE, we have supplier approval programs that monitor quality over time.

Fortunately, the other ingredients you might use in formulation are likely to have long-standing, reputable suppliers and FDA designations. Consult suppliers based on their systems for different types of tests. For example, if they use a liquid process, there is greater risk of mold compared to a powder.

TEST FOR EFFICACY

This is a highly detailed topic on its on accord; what follows is a summary of the process.

Producers should conduct efficacy testing on the same material that will be used in the finished product. CBD products should be developed like medicines, even though they are not yet regulated as such. A double-blind triangle test should be performed to establish efficacy according to various variables: potency, formulation, supplementary actives. In the THC market, product development can be hindered by regulation; fortunately, CBD is not so severely restricted. Make sure that your test group is large enough to justify your claims, even if you will not be making them on the label.

TEST FOR QUALITY

QA is primarily focused on safety, but the quality is a natural side effect. A hazard analysis must be conducted for the formula, the process, and the supplier chain. Each represents a different set of risks that have to be identified and monitored. Closely adjacent to QA is Regulatory. Depending on the type of product you are producing, regulatory documentation could include any of the following documents: Allergen statement, COAs, BSE/TSE, Ethical Sourcing/Trafficking, Food Grade Statement, FSMA Compliant Statement/FDA Registration, Gluten Statement, GMO Statement, Halal Certificate, Ingredient Declaration, Kosher Cert or Number, Letter of Continuing Guarantee, Natural Statement, Nutrition Information, Organic Statement, Product Data Sheet or Product Spec, Prop 65 Statement, Residual Solvents, Safety Data Sheet, Storage and Shelf Life, Third Party Audit, and Vegan/Vegetarian statement — but it is not standardized.

The sheer complexity of the testing and regulations that may apply to your CBD product can be daunting. Choosing SōRSE takes care of a lot of the worry for you. Here, we work with trusted, reliable suppliers and have leading-edge safety and regulatory standards. Our commitment to science is not only our superpower, but your ticket to peace of mind.

Thanksgiving Recipe: Pumpkin Pie

pumpkin pie displayed in front of pumpkin

‘Tis the season to be thankful! At SōRSE, we’re thankful for a lot of things: Our awesome team; our chef, Stacy Primack; and all of the yummy treats that she makes for us. Try out Stacy’s pumpkin pie recipe for your Worksgiving, Friendsgiving, or Thanksgiving dessert this month. You won’t be disappointed!

Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Yield: 8 portions

CBD per slice: 10 mg

Pie Ingredients:

3 eggs

2 c. pumpkin

2/3 c. sugar

A pinch of salt

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1 c. evaporated milk

2.667 g. SōRSE liquid

1/2 tsp. ginger, freshly grated

1/4 tsp. mace, toasted to bring out flavor

1/4 tsp. allspice, ground and toasted to bring out flavor

Ready to bake pie crust

Topping:

2 c. cold whipping cream

3 T. sugar or maple syrup

3/4 tsp. vanilla extract

  • Place all pie ingredients in a large, deep bowl or deep, round container (about 8 inches deep).
  • Using an immersion (stick) blender, blend thoroughly until evenly combined, and without lumps.
  • TIP: It is best to let this mixture sit overnight in the refrigerator to let flavors macerate.
  • The next day, remove the filling from the refrigerator, give a stir with a whisk by hand, and then pour filling into pie shell.
  • Bake at 325F until set and not jiggly or wet-looking in the middle. Remove from oven before any cracks start to show.
  • Let cool at room temperature and then refrigerate overnight.
  • Next day, grab an empty mixer bowl and place in the freezer for 20 minutes.
  • For the topping, add cream, syrup, and vanilla and whip on medium low speed until soft peaks, increase speed to high and whip until cream is stiff enough to stand on its own.
  • (Test: Dip your finger into the whipped cream, and if it holds, it should form a light peak. Do not over-whip, or you’ll have butter.)
  • When ready, use a spoon to place the cream into a piping bag.
  • The next day, take the pie out of the refrigerator, mark it first into 8 even slices, then use a hot chef’s knife (that you have heated under water and wiped clean with a dish towel) to make cuts.
  • Decorate with whipped cream.



nutritional information